Qizhi Security Audit System (Web-Based)


Qizhi was a client of us when I was working at EICO design. Their security audit system is the very first and pioneering company targeting security solutions for business. In 2016 November, I assisted an interaction designer with applying UI design for over 50+ pages with consistent visual style defined before and expanded the design system and guidelines accordingly.

Product Page →

Team:
1 Interaction Designer (Project Manager)
3 Visual Designer (including me)

Role & Duration
Visual Design, Design Guidelines
1 month

Tool:
Sketch, Photoshop

Deliverables

According to previous visual design, I applied the consistent design style for 50+ pages including inspection, account management, audit, file transmission. I also expanded the design system including icons, lists as well as other components accordingly. I specifically designed the icons for file transmissions and expanded the design system for buttons and lists and refined navigation design guideline.

Account Management
Audit
Inspection
File Transmission
Other Pages I designed
Icon Library
Status for Inspection Result
Buttons
List
Navigation Layout

Reflection | What I Learned

Communication is the key when the design is intimidating

While I was designing the list items for the product, I learned from the conversation with the interation designer that the users who audit are generally used to command line interface or interfaces that are of high information/data-density and not used to lists where line-spacing is high. Large line-spacing actually would lower their productivity. This experience gives me an insight of how users perspective, training background and context would influence how the desirability or aesthetics needed for the design. There might be universal design standards but it's essential to keep tuned for specific or context-based adjustment.

Desirability and aesthetics have specific context-dependent standards

While I was designing the list items for the product, I learned from the conversation with the interation designer that the users who audit are generally used to command line interface or interfaces that are of high information/data-density and not used to lists where line-spacing is high. Large line-spacing actually would lower their productivity. This experience gives me an insight of how users perspective, training background and context would influence how the desirability or aesthetics needed for the design. There might be universal design standards but it's essential to keep tuned for specific or context-based adjustment.